Saturday, April 30, 2016

Zinnia

Grampy loved to grow flowers
in his carefully tended garden.
His favourites were the Zinnia,
saying they were like Gram,
colourful and bold,
dancing in the sunshine,
attracting others with 
an unrivaled beauty.
Gram spoke of this memory,
long after she left him.
Grampy remembered, too,
as he sat in his easy-chair, 
silent tears on his face.

~McGuffy Ann Morris

Contemplating the letter Z, this poem wrote itself from my childhood memories. Some memories don’t fade but remain suspended in the darkest corners of the heart until we shine a light on them again. Grampy, this one is for you. 

Please read my Challenge Reveal Post for insight on the poetry that I chose to share here.



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Friday, April 29, 2016

You Say

You say I am mysterious.
Let me explain myself:
In a land of oranges
I am faithful to apples.

~Elsa Gidlow

Succinct and to the point, I see myself here. I have always followed my own heart and soul. My conscience leads the way, even when the journey is not an easy or popular one. As the old saying goes, “What matters most is how you see Yourself.” 

Please read my Challenge Reveal Post for insight on the poetry that I chose to share here. 


Thursday, April 28, 2016

X

marks the spot…
where I buried the excised detritus
of a relationship that explored
the very depths of exalted love.

I never considered exceeding expectations,
though I exhausted all extenuating possibilities.
After careful examination of your exhibition,
I am exonerated. No explanation is needed.

I will not further excavate my heart and soul;
I will not exhume extraneous vestige.
Extinguished, heart in exodus, it leaves
only a final example of abdication.

Yet, I know that love exists.  

~McGuffy Ann Morris

Poems that have the letter X in the title are difficult to find. I had no favourite “X” poems. So, I wrote this poem especially for this challenge. With that being said, this poem is extremely meaningful to me because of the content that I have expressed. It is my hope that it speaks to others who may read it and connect with these heartfelt feelings. 

Please read my Challenge Reveal Post for insight on the poetry that I chose to share here. 


Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Hey, there...


Warning

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn't go, and doesn't suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we've no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I'm tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people's gardens
And learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.

But maybe I ought to practice a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple. 

~Jenny Joseph

I first read this poem when I was a young wife. I thought it was amusing because I also have always tried to be responsible and proper. However, also being a bit feisty, I fancied that I might be like that, eventually. This may be my very favourite poem. 

Now, many years later, “eventually” is fast approaching. I continue to be very responsible, though. I have always given life all of myself, at any given time. I still have some of myself in reserve, though, for my golden years. It is waiting in my closet with purple outfits and a red hat that doesn’t really suit me. And, I think it is time to start practicing, now. 

Please read my Challenge Reveal Post for insight on the poetry that I chose to share here. 


Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Not in Vain

If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain.
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.

~Emily Dickinson

This poem has been a favourite since I first read it at age thirteen. It gave me purpose then, and I have tried to live my life with this in mind.  

Please read my Challenge Reveal Post for insight on the poetry that I chose to share here.