Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Detroit

 Sunrise over Detroit, Michigan.
  

A current industrial section of Detroit.

Security enforced fenced-in business truck lot.

A now abandoned Detroit business.

Once thriving, Detroit is now neglected.

Detroit's sad reality today.

This is the result of U.S. manufacturing 
"outsourcing" work to other countries.
It is a sad truth that Americans live with,
which ultimately affects us all.
Detroit is only one of many areas of the 
United States hit by this problem.
Bill was in manufacturing for 35 years
before losing his job, and having to 
re-invent himself for employment.
He went into trucking to contribute,
to help move the economy.
Bill took these photos from his truck.
This is not a negative post on Detroit, 
it is a cry for her and her sister cities.
I post this for awareness of this reality,
and for those who lost their jobs to it.

22 comments:

  1. I've read about it, but nothing can make it a more vivid reality that actually seeing the empty buildings. I don't know what's wrong with our country. Dollar crazy.

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    1. There are many cities like this throughout America. Bill took these pictures because he was so moved by the once busy area for manufacturing, now abandoned.

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  2. Detroit is probably the worst, but not the only. Corporations and profits are ruling our country while everyone runs to support the culprets on election day. We get what we wish for ...

    Andrea

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    1. Detroit is definitely one of many. We did not get what we wished for, however. The people who put many years of hard labour into manufacturing did not wish to lose their jobs...like Bill. Many people made their money off of things that were not/are not good for people or the environment, run by politicians and corporations, with serious consequences. Manufacturing took a serious hit that will have lasting results, as well. We did not choose this.

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  3. When I worked in El Paso I had boss that was from Detroit, he left to move west when the decline of his beloved city was more than he could bear. Your pictures tell the tragic tale too well. I think of all the jobs, lives, and families that have been effected. It is an American tragedy.

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    1. It truly is an American tragedy, and this tells a chapter of the tale.

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  4. an old blog pal of mine used to be a detroit firefighter. he took early retirement due to budget cuts. and he often told about the blight, the fires set in abandoned buildings, the hopelessness. very sad.

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    1. When manufacturing goes away, it affects everything...and everyone sooner or later.

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  5. It's just sad...with no solution in sight!

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  6. The pictures say it all. It's a sad, sad story. We have got to invest in America!

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    1. Thank you, Pat. That is where we need to be concerned. This is our country. We need to take care of it and each other. It is our future, not only our present.

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  7. The middle class will become extinct at some point. When that happens we'll be done for. The middle class has been keeping this country afloat for a very long time.

    Have a terrific day. ☺

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    1. Our country was built by the middle class, the blue collar worker. They are the ones who have less and less. That is not what they worked for or deserve.

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  8. I'm from Detroit. YOu can't imagine how hard my heart thumped when I saw this in my reader. Detroit isn't what I remember but it isn't dead. For one, we still have a thriving art community and where there are artists there is hope and determination.

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  9. For anyone who'd like to know more about Detroit through the eyes of her poets, I highly recommend, _Abandon Automobile: Detroit City Poetry 2001_ edited by Melba Joyce Boyd and M.L. Liebler

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    1. Please know that my post on Detroit is from the point of unemployment, lost jobs, what has happened due to corporate outsourcing. It is in cities all over the U.S. America needs to save herself. As stated, my husband lost his job. He became a trucker after 35 years in manufacturing. We are outside Chicago, a sister city to Detroit, in many ways.
      This is not a slam against Detroit. It is a cry for her, and all of her sister cities.
      It is sad that people are suffering. That is my point of concern.

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  10. McGuffy, I didn't take your post as a slam. I did want to tell others that the city isn't dead though because when you see these images and you have no Detroit experiences, it is hard to imagine this city is still breathing. That was all I wanted to inject. For most people you say Detroit and all images are negative. How many know how many poets, artists, musicians (and I mean beyond Motown) and writers hail from Detroit? I miss the city I grew up in. I, left, too, but I remember when.

    The collection of poetry gives a glimpse into a Detroit most people don't know ever existed.

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    1. We are very familiar with Michigan, including the Detroit area. We used to visit MI. yearly, and love it. My husband did business there, as well. I have friends from Detroit. This is why it breaks our heart, to see these once thriving cities being neglected. We need to take it to heart and fix these cities and help their people. They are our history, our present and our future.

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  11. I wish everyone here understood that. The reality is as Detroit fails so do the outlaying areas. If you think Detroit is bad off, visit the former small towns that were dependent of military stations. We have whole small towns on public assistance. We need our urban centers. They are hubs. Even if you don't want to live in the city, we need to support them. Thanks.

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    1. I very much agree with you. The decay spreads. We need to go back and rebuild the infrastructure to support the entire areas of these cities. We need to do it now. We need to save America from the inside out.

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  12. A picture really does speak a thousand words.

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