Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Kansas

Kansas is deep in America's heartland.

There are many farms that grow a variety 
of grain, vegetables, and hay for livestock. 

Cattle yards are an integral part of Kansas. 
 Livestock yards and "packing plants" are a very 
important part of the farming industry in Kansas.

Cattle are fed in special feeding pens and 
holding yards, to be processed year-round.
 This is a Winter feeding yard near Dodge City.

A busy feed mill for the cattle near Dodge City.

Kansas has a rugged beauty, and a long, 
important history of helping keep America fed.

Linked to: Our World Tuesday

29 comments:

  1. Interesting information! Thank you for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Janet. I like to share what I learn, and learn from others.

      Delete
  2. There is so much out there to see!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The world is so big, and has so much to teach us.

      Delete
  3. i love the slightly rolling hills of kansas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like Kansas, too. I like the expansiveness of it.

      Delete
  4. Wishing all our farmers a good harvest.

    Dad's family left Kansas during the Dust Bowl years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do, as well. Good truckers and farmers have a connection of respect and appreciation. My kinfolk went North during the Great Depression.

      Delete
  5. I'm amazed at how the cattle keep their distance from each others. I also wonder how they keep their hooves from freezing. We have cattle in the back who don't come in the barn but stay where it's cold in the shelter.
    Thanks for the info.
    Hugs,
    JB

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dairy cattle and beef cattle are so different. It is almost as if the beef cattle give up and just deal with things. They know no other way. It is actually rather sad.

      Delete
  6. We've traveled through Kansas several times- interesting country.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sure you have seen some beautiful places, Terri. Thank you for sharing them through your amazing photos.

      Delete
  7. #1 Son moved to Kansas for a year, and he was impressed, as well as a bit surprised at how different it was from "back home."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't seen much of your neck of the woods...but I really want to!

      Delete
  8. I was amazed the time we drove through Kansas at how far between the towns were. Of course that was many years ago. It is probably different now.. Great photos!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is one thing that amazes me: Kansas goes on forever, it seems.

      Delete
  9. I think many times we tend to forget the work and dedication it takes to get that beef to market. A lot has to happen before we can purchase it from the grocery store shelves.
    Wonderful landscapes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Carletta. You are so right, we forget what it takes to get our food and needs to us. There is a lot of work behind it!

      Delete
  10. I always thought Kansas was flat and boring, but then I only traveled through it as a child. I also thought Nebraska was boring until I went there to see the Sandhill Crane migration. I now know that I need to look at things through different eyes. There is wonder in any place you go if you are open to it. These are great pictures Annie and you opened my eyes to a part of Kansas that I wasn't aware of. Nice post ...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love to learn and share...and learn...thanks, Andrea.

      Delete
  11. I've always liked Kansas, so big and flat. You could see all of the clouds and everything. Also the weather is very interesting, snow and thunderstorms. My older sister went on a business trip there and there was a snow storm and then a severe thunderstorm the next day, or week! : )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kansas is a great state for its wild beauty and its history, too.

      Delete
  12. Good old Kansas, flat, flat, flat. The bright blue sky is gorgeous. Hugs, Janet

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kansas has a rugged charm to it, and a quiet loneliness.

      Delete
  13. I would LOVE to travel in that direction, But not by myself. :-( So I will stay here. xo

    ReplyDelete
  14. Since I come from Farmer Stock - Thank You!! Even though I'm Canadian farm stock - farmers all over the world are still such an important part of our society, our economics and our culture. I miss the farm - the daily simple life of tending the earth and animals.
    And I didn't think that Kansas would have snow! I feel an infinity with them now. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We respect farmers, coming from a lineage of them ourselves. They work hard to provide for us all. And truckers get it there.

      Delete
  15. Nice to know and see what is going on there:)

    ReplyDelete