Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Doing it Right

Today I am joining Rory Bore of Time Out for Mom for her Coffee Chat. Each week she hosts a “Coffee Chat” where we discuss topics that she presents to us. She always poses questions that make me think. This week, Ms. Rory Bore has asked us the profound question, “Are you more worried about doing things right, or doing the right things?”

I believe that doing things right and doing the right things are very tightly intertwined. At this point in my life I am very aware of my moral compass, and am careful to follow it.

Recently, I had the opportunity to serve on a “Board”. I felt this was the right thing to do, and did it for the right reasons. I wanted to volunteer in a position and capacity where I could represent others. I hoped to be their voice and look out for their best interest. I had also hoped to effect positive change.

In my position, I did everything that was expected of me according to the rules of the “Board”. I even went above and beyond, doing whatever was asked of me by other members. I took it all very seriously, wanting to do things right. I felt it was important.

Boards and committees tend to be political. Unfortunately, being politically correct is not the same as being morally correct. My moral compass seems to point in a different direction than some. I am not afraid to stand up for what I know to be right; I am not willing to settle for less. Consequently, I am no longer on this particular board.

I do not believe the concept of “politically correct”, especially when it conflicts with doing the right thing. I feel it is more important to be morally correct. I know that is the right thing for me. I cannot be a part of something where that is compromised. I try to do the right thing, and then do it right.


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11 comments:

  1. My sentiments exactly. I couldn't have stated my stand any better than that.
    I always try my best even if I have to go the extra mile and even though it's not convenient for me just as long as it's the right thing to do. I'm mostly happy because I have no expectations but I have a lot of hope. I can't change anyone, only myself.

    You did the right thing...
    Hugs,
    JB

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  2. A perfect example! Sometimes - things such as committees and Boards can get bogged down in being "legalistic" and actually lose sight of their important mission of Serving. I whole-heartedly agree with you on the moral compass - I think it's important that our outward actions always reflect our inner values.
    Thanks for joining me! Coffee is always on for you :)
    Safe travels to Bill.

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  3. Yes, exactly. Do what is right, not what is expedient politically.

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  4. guys...pleez ta tell yur mom...sad lee.... in this day N age, EVEREE THING iz "politickz"....

    thiz bee why uz animalz due knot.... "speek"...coz itz de rite thing ta due ♥♥

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  5. Makes you wonder if there is any truth to being "politically correct" when you cannot speak your mind or do what you feel is right!!...:)JP

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  6. I have not joined the board at the kid's school for this exact reason. Well said.

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  7. I had an equally bad experience while serving on a board. I think they expected a good girl that sat quietly and agreed to what the others wanted. I don't think they expected an uppity, oppositional Jew that had the audacity to point out what wasn't working.

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  8. I love this post...because I totally agree with it!

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  9. Yes and yes and yes and yes again!!!!!

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  10. I agree with you!
    Being politically correct is not the same as being morally correct.
    Many of those in high places could learn from this post. Thanks!

    Have a great day and a great weekend!

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  11. I totally agree with you that one can both do the right thing and do it right. Your motives for joining the board were the right thing, and you tried to do it right. I run into the same issues at work sometimes. I always stand for the right thing, no excuses, no exceptions, doing it right can be harder because it involves other people and convincing them to do it right too! Good thinking on this one, Annie!

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