Sunday, March 29, 2015

Easter Pets


I posted this last year, but it is important. Please read and share this information with others. Little lives depend on it...and you.
  
Every year hundreds of baby bunnies, chicks and ducklings are bought as  Easter gifts. While much thought is put into the “surprise” factor, little is put into the long term care and commitment. Consequently, the animals will suffer abuse or neglect. Many will be released into the wild, ultimately facing death.

It has been reported by the U.S. Humane Society that “within the initial weeks following Easter, 30% of these novelty Easter pets will die. Another 60-70% will be released or left at a shelter.” Most of those released or left at shelters are already ill or suffering.

Every Spring, shelters are inundated with bunnies, chicks, and ducklings that are dumped once the fun of the holiday is over. Little or no thought was put into their growth or care. They were purchased solely for human enjoyment, into homes not equipped for their needs.

Before purchasing any pet, do your research. Ask the right authority, go to the proper source. Read, go online, learn about the animal’s needs, proper care, and expected lifespan. See what is involved to keep the animal healthy. Know what the possible pitfalls are with the particular pet you are considering, such as the fact that chicks and ducklings are known to carry salmonella.

Following are some facts and links provided by the Humane Society of the United States. Please read, consider, and take this to heart. These are real live beings with beating hearts.

RABBITSAverage lifespan: 7-10 years
Facts:
Rabbits may not do well in a household with young children. They often do not like being lifted or held.
Rabbits like to dig and need to chew.
If you get multiple rabbits they should be spayed and neutered as soon as possible.
Multiple rabbits will often fight.
Weekly expenses can be in excess of $25.00 for food alone, per rabbit.
Research Sources:
www.rabbit.org

DUCKSAverage lifespan: 8-15 years
Facts:
Ducks are very social animals, and do better kept in groups (a “paddling” or “brace” of ducks).
Ducks need a lot of space and a shelter to keep them safe.
Ducklings will need to be kept in an indoor pen/cage for the several weeks.
Research Sources:
http://keeping-ducks.net

CHICKENS: Average lifespan: 5-8 years
Facts:
Chickens naturally scratch, peck and dig. If housing is inadequate, they will cause damage. 
Many towns and cities have regulations concerning chickens, regarding them “livestock”.
Health and zoning boards should be consulted.
Chickens are noisy, but roosters are especially noisy!
Research Sources:
http://www.backyardchickens.com

34 comments:

  1. Great post. It is so sad when ducks and rabbits are Easter presents. I hate seeing rabbits in the cages. Have a great Sunday.

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    1. Thank you, Marg. Living beings should not be presents. It is sad.

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  2. Wow....VERY informative! And at this time of year a very 'needed' post to share.

    Hope your Easter, tho, is filled with fun and laughter and sharing the reason for the season.

    Also, I want to thank you for your kind comment this morning.

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    1. Anni, I am glad you are better. Thank you for your comment here.

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  3. i really don't like that practice, either, unless you have a farm or are prepared for the long haul.

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    1. Exactly. Live animals are not toys. We need to teach responsibilty by example, and education is part of that.

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  4. Pet stores should make sure the buyers are aware of all the requirements to owning such pets before they are sold. I don't like the idea of getting these small pets to kids for any occasions. They multiply fast or are sometime pregnant when you buy them.

    Have a nice Sunday Annie,
    Hugs,
    JB

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    1. Unfortunately, money motivates pet stores. No one checks into the housing or owners of the pets, until the shelters get involved. Sad.

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  5. Well said. It always shocks me at the disregard of life when people give kids this kind of a gift. An animal is not a "gift", it is a long thought decision to add a member to your household.

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    1. Yes. These are family members who require love, attention, and respect.

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  6. A great reminder to spread the word! One year a long eared lop was found after being hit by a car on our road...because someone had set it "free." IDIOTS!...:)JP

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    1. As a child, I caught stray rabbits that had been domestic "throw-aways". I kept them. It bothers me that people still do this. As a society, we know better.

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  7. Replies
    1. It sickens me that it is allowed (even encouraged) by the retail industry.

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  8. Keep reminding people, every year!

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  9. Unfortunate and sad. We have such a problem here in the lower mainland of Vancouver, Canada with domestic rabbits that have been let loose because people who no longer choose to be responsible for them, are convinced they can survive in the wild. They can't. Sigh. We have a long way to go before all living creatures are finally and conclusively respected and protected . Great reminder!

    the critters in the cottage xo

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    Replies
    1. You are so very right. We need to keep working at it. Thanks, Critters.

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  10. This is so sad. We hope the message gets out and humans realize pets are a commitment, not just something cute for the moment.

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    1. We try to get the message out there because we believe pets are family members!

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  11. Replies
    1. Thanks, Gail. Now to get people to follow it!

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  12. Wonderful post and hope many people will heed your wonderful advice ~ our fur persons are treasure that need great loving care ~ xo

    Happy Week ahead to you,
    artmusedog and carol

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    1. We sure hope that this will deter people from impulsive decisions, so little critters can grow old and happy!
      Thank you both ~xo~

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  13. Those critters all deserve to be loved.

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  14. Oh I totally agree! Funny thing but I once had my own baby ducks, one mama and papa soon they'd be. They were given to us as a wedding present from a joking friend, inside a brown paper bag! He thought I'd just get rid of them, but of course how could I! They were mine now, so duck owners we became!

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    Replies
    1. I have no doubt that pair had a good home with you! Hug!

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  15. Excellent research and advice. Thanks for doing this, Annie. I did not realize that these animals have such long lifespans. Hugs, Janet

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  16. Well said and great research...Easter and Christmas always poor times for animals to be given as gifts..stick to chocolate i say :) hugs fozziemum xx

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  17. Grreat post!
    It is so sad when ducks and rabbits are Easter presents :(

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  18. You know, if someone wants to give a bunny or chick or duckling for a present, well, there are a ton of stuffed toy options and even more chocolate options. It boggles my mind how so many people have no regard for non-humans. As if, because they're not bipeds their lives somehow don't matter, that they're not Beings equally worthy of love, care, respect and consideration.

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  19. I very important PSA!! thank you for sharing.

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  20. Hi McGuffy,
    Thank you so much for this PSA.
    Responsible Pet Ownership and not giving into all the wants and needs of children, without thinking through, is something that costs these innocent animals a lot of misery and in many cases their life.

    I also want to thank you for the Inspiration Award. You are so kind and you too are an inspiration to me - especially on the animal welfare front.

    Peace :)

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