Friday, April 10, 2015

Yard Work

Please be careful!
Plants are not the only ones living in your yard!
I have rescued many wild newborn bunnies.
It is not an ideal or preferred start for them.
If you find a wild bunny nest, please call a 
knowledgeable wildlife rescue authority 
in your area for the proper assistance.
The Humane Society offers advice, too.
Wild Rabbit Information

34 comments:

  1. Good information! I've been watching for this too, we had so many bunnies over the winter...they were really growing like rabbits! Enjoy your weekend!

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    1. Bunnies do that! It sounds like they found a good area for their colony.

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  2. I never knew this about wild rabbits. We haven't seen any around here as there are foxes in the field.

    Thanks for the educational video.
    Hugs,
    JB

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    1. I have gotten to know them up close and personal. I love wild bunnies.

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  3. Yep, they can be just about anywhere!

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  4. Oh, yes, anytime you find unattended or young in need of care, always get local animal authorities/rescue involved....:)JP

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  5. guys...de easturr bunnee iz a lot smaller N reel life then we thinked !!! hope dad getted home aye oh kay...heerz two a largemouth bass lined sole kinda week oh end ♥♥♥

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    1. The Easter Bunny has big shoes to fill, though!

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  6. Aw, so cute...but you don't want them eating your new plants!

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    1. Well, in all fairness, they don't know the difference! Hug.

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  7. Good advice. We have few and they stay in the fields.

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    1. Thanks. They will definitely go where they feel safe and fed.

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  8. That is a really important reminder, McGuffy Ann. Thank you for sharing this ... there is wildlife everywhere!

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  9. Thanks for this reminder. A couple of years ago, I found a nest of baby bunnies in my yard under a bush. I just left them alone figuring the mom would take care of them. Unfortunately, something must have happened, and one day I found all the babies unresponsive. I called a wildlife expert but it was too late and we lost them all. I was so sad about it.

    Island Cat Mom

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    1. That is the tricky part...waiting to see if they are being cared for. We cannot always tell. Sad.

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  10. That video was so amazing. I had no idea so many babies were beneath the mom bunny. That was curious how she sealed the hole over. I suppose it was to protect her babies while she was away, but wouldn't they smother? I raised a wild baby bunny once after his mom was killed by a car. I called him Jelly Bean. Sending love and hugs, Janet

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  11. Very smart to look for bunnies and get proper help when needed.

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  12. Great advice! :-) We don't get wild rabbits around here but there were loads where I used to live - you'd see them all hanging out and chilling together together in little gangs and they weren't bothered by humans either. beautiful creatures. :-)

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  13. Thanks for the reminder although it is not possible to find those in my garden. But there are other creatures to to be taken care of:)

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    1. Always. There are always critters that need us.

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  14. Indeed we share the world we live in and must be careful always..when we have to take a dead tree down it will not be used for firewood unless it is clear it is not a habitat..always we need to be a bit more careful :) great info Annie :) hugs Fozziemum xxx

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    1. Respecting Mother Earth involves all of her living things.

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  15. My first piece of advise to anyone who finds a baby anything is to watch and see if mama comes back. Keep predators away if you must, but unless they are in immediate danger, watch and wait first.

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    1. I agree, Mimi. Human intervention is not preferable. The waiting game is tricky, though. Critters are not always detectable, often coming at hours that humans are not around. Humans that do assist need to be knowledgeable, though.

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  16. We didn't see one bunny on the Tiny Ten for nine years until last year. Two babies. Roaming cats, dogs, and other predatory critters don't give them much a chance.

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    1. Pix, unfortunately, you are right about that. As such gentle critters, they are easy prey. When I release them, I have to be conscious of that.

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  17. Yep,you must be careful when you dig in the garden Therese can be wildlife efurrywhere :)


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  18. I wish I could find a bunny nest!!
    I have put a bell on Cashew, so if he is wandering in the backyard this summer - - he won't be able to sneak up on any wildlife. He's not completely free -- he wears a harness and it's attached to a lead line so he can wander the backyard -- but not run away. Technically up here, there's a Bylaw against letting your cats roam freely.

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