Monday, June 22, 2015

Busy Bees

Trucking back and forth across America, Bill sees some interesting things. Recently, at a truck stop in Glade Spring, Virginia, he came across a truckload of honey bees.

He was just starting his day and the bees were starting theirs,  too. Many had escaped from the numerous hives secured under the special tarp covering the trailer.  

You can see a cloud of the bees above and around the tractor and trailer. 

Once the sun rises and the temperatures warm up the bees become very restless and active. They know there is much work to be done. 

The dark patches on the tarps are clusters of bees who have remained together. Each box contains one individual hive. On average, each hive can hold 20,00-60,000 bees. However, there is always only one queen per hive.

Commercial beekeeping  has grown into a multi-million dollar industry. Bees are trucked all over the nation. Bill estimated this load to be well over 900 hives, the most he has seen in a single load. 

Honeybees not only provide us with honey and other products, but they assist us in farming. Bees are responsible for pollinating crops that feed the nation and beyond. 

Sweet!

33 comments:

  1. That's an amazing post! I wonder if those bees follow the truck or set off to find a new queen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I wondered about that, too. Probably both things happen.

      Delete
  2. sure hope those hives make it through relocation and prosper in their new locations!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They usually do well, due to requirements and regulations. The beekeepers are pretty strict.

      Delete
  3. Dang, I'm not sure I'd want that job!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My great-grandfather was a beekeeper. I am not sure I could do it, though. Bill would do it. But, he is pretty fearless, especially with almost all critters.

      Delete
  4. guys....beez rock...plane & simpull....knot de experiment....genetic lee... modified beez thatz killin peepulz & petz out SW, but de honey & de bumble....we wunder if de onze that getted looze will get severance pay.... !! ♥♥♥ happee bee lated two yur dad; we wuz gonna send him a card but we runned outta data plan til fryday ....~~~~~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, guys. I think if the bees walk out on the job they might lose their benefits. They are always a flight risk. ❤

      Delete
  5. I hope there was a bee keeper to help get the guys back safe in their hives before the truck went on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know how they could figure out which hive. They usually try to truck them in the dark to keep them calm and cool.

      Delete
  6. That is a lot of bees, I feel bad for the ones that fly away on the road, I wonder where they end up ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bees have great instinct. They can start new hives.

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. I love learning new things, especially about critters.

      Delete
  8. Wow, I sure hope the load of bees arrives to their destination safe and sound. It would be a very difficult situation should an accident happens and the truck overturn. Trucking bees is serious business.
    Thanks for this post and happy summer.

    Hugs,
    JB

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so very right. It does happen, where there are accidents. It is a serious situation. ❤

      Delete
  9. I never thought about bees being transported...until now!...:)JP

    ReplyDelete
  10. I can't imagine a truckload of bees cruising down the highway at 70 plus miles an hour!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is pretty amazing when you think about it!

      Delete
  11. oh this sooooo amazing!!! I've never seen anything like it. well, I imagine if you were allergic, you might not be as thrilled as I, but the thing is: bees are so important!!! they are crucial to our eco system, so it is great to know that bee farming is actually a thing. thank Bill for sharing!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love to learn new things and share. Bill is really great about it. Glad you enjoyed this. ❤

      Delete
  12. Great photos of the bees and very informative post about hubby's trucking contents~

    Happy Week to you,
    artmusedog and carol

    ReplyDelete
  13. How interesting that they truck the bees from place to place. Must mean they are finally getting the respect they deserve. Very interesting glimpse into a world we would not normally get to see.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Ooops. Forgot to add that there is only ever one true Queen!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Bees are amazing and important creatures! I'm wondering what happens to the ones that have escaped those hives ... do they just fly along with the truck as it travels down the highway?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sadly, no. Bees can fly up to 6 miles, and as fast as 15 mph.

      Delete
  16. Bees are wonderful, but i wouldn't want to be responsible for that many!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Wow that's an amazing set of photos. That's also a lot of very important bees.

    ReplyDelete
  18. This is a really cool post, Annie - lots of good information!
    Have a Wonderful Day!
    Peace :)

    ReplyDelete