Monday, June 1, 2015

Kiowa


...the Wayward Turtle

Bill has spent the past two weeks trucking back and forth through the very flood-ravaged Oklahoma and Texas. While trucking through the Kiowa nation of Oklahoma, he was able to rescue a Red Eared Slider. These are considered "common" water turtles. However, once plentiful, they are now becoming endangered due to commercialism. 

It is important to release a turtle in its natural habitat, as close to where it is found as possible. This ensures the turtle will be able to find food, shelter, and be able to survive. Knowing this, Bill was on a mission to find "Kiowa" a safe, secure spot to be released. He succeeded. He was able to find her a secluded area, still within the Kiowa nation. The rainwater drainage area he discovered ran down, into a creek.   

 
Kiowa gets her footing in the cold floodwater. 

She quickly knows what she needs to do, and she does it.

Flooded or not, this is Kiowa's natural home. 

And she knew it. Going, going, gone. 

Please remember that floods affect critters, too. The waters flush out many species of critters that live along the creeks and rivers. These critters seek new, safer places to make their homes. Often they end up crossing roads to find dryer options. Bill was Kiowa's hero, going above and beyond. Please be a hero simply by watching out for these critters on the roads that you travel. They are just trying to survive, too.

39 comments:

  1. Bill has a good heart. It's wonderful to know he's out there looking after the critters. :-)

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  2. we've had a ton of turtles crossing roadways here! too often not successfully.

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    1. We need to slow down and remember we share the earth with others. Bill is always conscious of this and does what he can. We hope others will do the same.

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    1. Bill always does what he can for critters and the environment.

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  4. Anni, what a great hubby you have to rescue this poor critter. Good story!

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    1. Stay tuned...he did it again. He is a great guy.

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  5. Thank Bill for me and thank you many do not know this.

    I heard a story where a child was snake bit by the snakes moving closer to the schools during the floods.

    Thanks for visiting. I will try to encourage my plants to flourish and produce many seeds to share.

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    1. Unfortunately, this happens. We need to take extra precautions in times like this. Critters are afraid, homeless, and stressed. Schools need to be aware.

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  6. Dang, we just had one of those in our driveway yesterday. The Dad helped him find his way back to the lake.

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  7. guys !!! 10 bazillion paws up two yur dad !!! how way kewl iz thiz.....St Francis bee smilin down on him...N thatz....a good thing !!! ♥♥♥

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    1. St. Francis is Bill's saint. They are a good team! ❤

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  8. Hooray! Such a sweet thing. I do hope all goes well with the journey back, for Bill and all the others out there too!

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    1. We hope so, too. It is such a mess there.

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  9. We had two box turtles that lived in our back yard when I was a kid. I've only recently learned how important it is to keep them in the area where you find them if at all possible.

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    1. I had a variety of pet turtles my entire life. They are amazing creatures!

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  10. There have been quite a few turtles i've helped cross the road safely. And Sweetie always makes traffic stop on the campus if he sees a duck or goose crossing.

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    1. Here at home we have moved snappers, sliders, and assorted critters. It helps!

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  11. That gladdened my own heart. I always help turtles to the other side of a road and never fail to keep them from harm if I am fortunate enough to see one. I am so glad Bill did that.

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    1. If you can do that, it is wonderful. Bill does what he can.

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  12. Everyone needs a helping hand now and then. What a blessing you and Bill are for the critters.

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    1. We both try, and we hope everyone does their part.

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  13. We are turtle movers here too... get them across the road the way they are headed!

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    1. That is ideal when you can do it. If not, at least get them out of the road and into a safe place where they can live naturally.

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  14. Bill is such a sweetie to stop and assist the turtle. It's hard to do when you're on the clock like he is....very commendable.

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    1. Bill was able to safely save her. He tries; he feels he has to at least try.

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  15. Good Karma, for y'all, Annie & Bill!
    Have a Beautiful Week!
    Peace :)

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  16. I used two have a couple of turtles that I released into the wild when they got too big. And we always rescue turtles off the road up here. On our last camping trip we attended a whole session from the professional staff on how to rescue turtles properly. did you know that you are not supposed to pick them up by their shells!? (without also supporting them from underneath if they are small enough) I did not know that and I felt horrible. Now we carry a small shovel in our trunk, so that when we encounter one on the road, we slide the shovel gently under the turtle, and then carry it off the road to safety. And always in the direction they were heading!! otherwise, they will just cross right back.

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    1. It is important to keep turtles moving to where they are headed...unless for instance you are a trucker and it isn't possible. Then you get them as close to that as you can. On the expressway, there was no way she was going to get where she wanted to go...alive. Nor was Bill going to be able to get her there...alive. It is really important to remember to release them as close to where you found them...if at all possible. They are used to certain foods, vegetation, mud/soil, water conditions, etc. You shouldn't take a Florida turtle to Nebraska for release. Always do what is best for the turtle. Sometimes it is not an ideal situation, but it still saves the turtle's life. That is what is ultimately important.

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  17. What a great samaritan Bill is. We are happy he was able to safe this turtle. We have done that a few times when we have found them on the path of our greenway. Hugs, Janet

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