Thursday, March 24, 2016

Easter Pets


  
Every year hundreds of baby bunnies, chicks and ducklings are bought as  Easter gifts. While much thought is put into the “surprise” factor, little is put into the long term care and commitment. Consequently, the animals will suffer abuse or neglect. Many will be released into the wild, ultimately facing death.

It has been reported by the U.S. Humane Society that “within the initial weeks following Easter, 30% of these novelty Easter pets will die. Another 60-70% will be released or left at a shelter.” Most of those released or left at shelters are already ill or suffering.

Every Spring, shelters are inundated with bunnies, chicks, and ducklings that are dumped once the fun of the holiday is over. Little or no thought was put into their growth or care. They were purchased solely for human enjoyment, into homes not equipped for their needs.

Before purchasing any pet, do your research. Ask the right authority, go to the proper source. Read, go online, learn about the animal’s needs, proper care, and expected lifespan. See what is involved to keep the animal healthy. Know what the possible pitfalls are with the particular pet you are considering, such as the fact that chicks and ducklings are known to carry salmonella.

Following are some facts and links provided by the Humane Society of the United States. Please read, consider, and take this to heart. These are real live beings with beating hearts.

RABBITS: Average lifespan: 7-10 years
Facts:
Rabbits may not do well in a household with young children. They often do not like being lifted or held.
Rabbits like to dig and need to chew.
If you get multiple rabbits they should be spayed and neutered as soon as possible.
Multiple rabbits will often fight.
Weekly expenses can be in excess of $25.00 for food alone, per rabbit.
Research Sources:
www.rabbit.org

DUCKS: Average lifespan: 8-15 years
Facts:
Ducks are very social animals, and do better kept in groups (a “paddling” or “brace” of ducks).
Ducks need a lot of space and a shelter to keep them safe.
Ducklings will need to be kept in an indoor pen/cage for the several weeks.
Research Sources:
http://keeping-ducks.net

CHICKENS: Average lifespan: 5-8 years
Facts:
Chickens naturally scratch, peck, and dig. If housing is inadequate, they will cause damage. 
Many towns and cities have regulations concerning chickens, regarding them “livestock”.
Health and zoning boards should be consulted.
Chickens are noisy, but roosters are especially noisy!
Research Sources:
http://www.backyardchickens.com


I have posted this in the past; it is very important. 
Please read and share this information with others. 
Little lives depend on it...and you.


16 comments:

  1. Critters are forever! Great post indeed!

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  2. guys.....thiz izza grate post...thanx for sharin....we troo lee dinna noe a bun lived that manee yeerz !!!

    heerz two a ham samich, dino eggz, happee easturr, kinda week oh end two all !! ►◄►◄►◄►◄

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  3. Thanks for posting this. It really is a serious matter.

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  4. Very important. I think a lot of people have no idea of the lifespan of these animals and just consider them a novelty. Happy Easter.Love and hugs, Janet

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  5. I don't think you could post this enough. There are people out there who just don't think past Easter morning! Have a blessed day!

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  6. This is always very sad. I remember when I was a kid it was the "in thing" for people to buy their kids chicks that had been dyed different colors. Thankfully my parents never got us any of these animals as pets. Thanks for sharing this.

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  7. Thank you! This needs to be said over and over until the practice of selling these sweet animals as novelties stops!

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  8. Excellent post and so important for Easter. I have had many rabbits over the years and they are wonderful, but a lot of work and definitely not for young children. The last one I had lived for 13 years.

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  9. A great, and very needed, post!!!!

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  10. It is never a good idea to give an animal as a surprise gift. Great information!

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  11. Hi Annie, I typed a comment yesterday but somehow it didn't made it here. I'll try again. Sometimes I forget to click publish.
    I think it's wonderful that you do this every year. I agree that it's not a good idea to but pets for Easter presents without knowing all there is to know about the pet.
    Keep up the good work.
    Happy Easter.
    Hugs,
    JB

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  12. Awesome post, McGuffy Ann. Thank you for sharing this really important information! We'll share.

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  13. Disturbing! Thanks for the details. Why do people gift bunnies etc for Easter?? Is it a tradition..a ritual?

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  14. Thanks for this important post! So many bunnies and chicks are abandoned and many die after Easter. So unfair and tragic ...hopefully, more people will become informed and make better choices.

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