Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence.
As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even to the dull and the ignorant, they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love, for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass.
Take kindly to the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.
Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace in your soul.
With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.
~Max Ehrmann, 1927


 “Desiderata” is Latin for “things desired. As a teenager, this prose poem truly affected me. It speaks of the important things that I felt sure I needed to know for a lifetime. I still have my copy of the 1976 book, The Desiderata of Happiness, A collection of philosophical poems by Max Ehrmann, author of Desiderata. Even now, I feel the words of the Desiderata are worth reading, repeating, and taking to heart.

Please read my Challenge Reveal Post for insight on the poetry that I chose to share here.



25 comments:

  1. Indeed, very inspiring. I understand why it stuck with you. Thank you for sharing this wonderful read.

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    1. It literally has the same effect now as it did 40+ years ago. I am glad you like it, too.

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  2. I've always loved that, had it printed and framed for many years. The advice is timeless, and so true.

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    1. I did, too, Kea. I had it as a poster and then a framed piece. I actually kept a printed sheet in my prayer book, until the sheet wore out.

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  3. I have read that poem many times and it really resonated with me too and still does. I really enjoyed reading it again. You can't read it too often in my opinion.
    Have a beautiful day Annie and thanks for this.
    Hugs,
    JB

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  4. Very nice. Thank you for sharing.
    Awakening Dreams and Conquering Nightmares with a Pen
    I’m really enjoying my little focus on music this month. Be well!

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  5. Oooh! Another one I've loved for more than 40 years!! I've had posters of Desiderata hanging on my wall and I have read more of Max Erhmann's wonderful poetry. Excellent choice for D, Annie! :-)

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    1. It seems that the Desiderata strikes a chord, as it should. It certainly does with me. Thanks.

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  6. This is one of my favorites. When I had a house and therefore walls, I had this framed and would read it as I passed by. I found it very calming and grounding.

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    1. You could probably get a copy of this for your Kindle. See? You do like poetry. I knew it! Poetry is for everyone.

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  7. Every time i read it, another phrase strikes me as it hasn't before. Keeping interest in my own career has been difficult, as i am "just a maid/janitor", but i will try.

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    1. No such things as "just a..." Each and every one has a purpose. Bless the maids and janitors. Hugs.

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  8. Excellent choice for the D part of your challenge Annie ♥♥♥ ~~~~~~~~~~

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  9. What lovely and wise words. I should print this and post it in a frame, so I can read and remember. You have dogs too. I had a dog once, and sure loved her. She got me out more, on walks. I love the nicknames on the sidebar you have given the cats.

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  10. I have not read that in a very long time. Thank you :)

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  11. YES! THIS!! I have this one in my home too -- one of my favourite pieces.

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  12. This is beautiful. I have a feeling that if I had read it as a teen it would have gone right over my head and not into my heart as it does now. XO

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  13. You always seem to find the magical words.

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  14. Along with Emerson's esssay "Self-Reliance", this is one of those profound works that anyone can find meaning in.

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  15. Such a powerful poem. I, too, remember the first time I read this, and how much it touched and affected me. Thank you for sharing it!

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  16. Definitely inspiring words to live by! Thanks for sharing...it's been a long time since I read this.

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