Saturday, April 15, 2017

"Easter Pets"


I post this yearly, because it is important. Please read and share this information with others. Little lives depend on it...and you.
  
Every year hundreds of baby bunnies, chicks and ducklings are bought as  Easter gifts. While much thought is put into the “surprise” factor, little is put into the long term care and commitment. Consequently, the animals will suffer abuse or neglect. Many will be released into the wild, ultimately facing death.

It has been reported by the U.S. Humane Society that “within the initial weeks following Easter, 30% of these novelty Easter pets will die. Another 60-70% will be released or left at a shelter.” Most of those released or left at shelters are already ill or suffering.

Every Spring, shelters are inundated with bunnies, chicks, and ducklings that are dumped once the fun of the holiday is over. Little or no thought was put into their growth or care. They were purchased solely for human enjoyment, into homes not equipped for their needs.

Before purchasing any pet, do your research. Ask the right authority, go to the proper source. Read, go online, learn about the animal’s needs, proper care, and expected lifespan. See what is involved to keep the animal healthy. Know what the possible pitfalls are with the particular pet you are considering, such as the fact that chicks and ducklings are known to carry salmonella.

Following are some facts and links provided by the Humane Society of the United States. Please read, consider, and take this to heart. These are real live beings with beating hearts.

RABBITS: Average lifespan: 7-10 years
Facts:
Rabbits may not do well in a household with young children. They often do not like being lifted or held.
Rabbits like to dig and need to chew.
If you get multiple rabbits they should be spayed and neutered as soon as possible.
Multiple rabbits will often fight.
Weekly expenses can be in excess of $25.00 for food alone, per rabbit.
Research Sources:
www.rabbit.org

DUCKS: Average lifespan: 8-15 years
Facts:
Ducks are very social animals, and do better kept in groups (a “paddling” or “brace” of ducks).
Ducks need a lot of space and a shelter to keep them safe.
Ducklings will need to be kept in an indoor pen/cage for the several weeks.
Research Sources:
http://keeping-ducks.net

CHICKENS: Average lifespan: 5-8 years
Facts:
Chickens naturally scratch, peck, and dig. If housing is inadequate, they will cause damage. 
Many towns and cities have regulations concerning chickens, regarding them “livestock”.
Health and zoning boards should be consulted.
Chickens are noisy, but roosters are especially noisy!
Research Sources:
http://www.backyardchickens.com                     

15 comments:

  1. I think a far better gift at Easter would be a cuddly rabbit, chick or duckling, rather than a living one. A stuffed toy is probably going to be a lot more cuddly than the real thing anyway, less mess, less work and it'll always stay small and cute. ;-)

    Cait @ Click's Clan

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    1. Real animals are living beings, not toys. I love them for who they are. I respect them.

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  2. I agree with you about what to know before getting a pet for Easter.
    I just buy the little one soft stuffed bunnies instead of the real ones.
    I think the pet store should share the responsibility of informing the customer who buy pets for the wrong reason. Too often it's all about making a buck.
    Hugs, Julia

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    1. Agreed! But pet stores are about money, sadly. Hugs.

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  3. I feel so bad for those little critters. Thanks for sharing the important reminder.

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  4. Well said! Thank you for posting this each year, i hope someday the world will be out enough that you won't have to post it any more.

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  5. Excellent post. Rabbits are a lot of work and many do bite out of fear, definitely not for kids. Before I became a crazy cat lady, I was a crazy rabbit lady.My last one lived to be 13. XO

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    1. I had rabbits as a kid in Texas. I loved them. I have nurtured wild rescue rabbits, mostly orphaned babies. You are so right to mention bites. They also are prone to clawing with hind feet when picked up. Thanks for this!

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  6. The girls have been begging me for WEEKS if they could get a bunny for Easter. Or a hamster. Or a guinea pig. A ferret??! I almost gave in on the ferret because they are just so interesting. But no girls - pets are serious responsibilities not holiday gimmicks!! So I took them to a local petting zoo this weekend instead. A farmer I know personally, so I know the animals are well cared for by lovely people. They loved running around the yard with the goats. MUCH better than things kept in cages.

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  7. Great research and information for anyone thinking of adopting one of these animals as a pet. Thanks Annie. Love, prayers and hugs to all, Janet

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  8. My family always took pets seriously, I'm happy to say. My worst sin is getting fish from the pet store and learning they aren't fit for my tank as advertised. Be well!

    http://darlamsands.blogspot.com/

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