Saturday, June 10, 2017

The Mine


We knew the mine would not last. Generations had paid the price of it, though. Men were born into it, going one after another into the dark depths of the mine. Some never came out. 

The mine had taken many men, the shafts becoming their tombs. Some died young; the easy way out. Others died a slow death of defeat. Either way, the mine took their soul.

The mine is gone, now. When all was said and done, man would have nothing for all of their blood, sweat, and tears. All that was left would be a black hole and pile of rocks. 

The earth was bound to reclaim itself. Soil, plants, animals, and even rocks would eventually need to go back. 

The trees stood their ground around that black hole. The earth is rising back up, again. It is determined to heal itself, and all of us.


*Story by McGuffy Ann Morris
Word Count= 150
Image by Pamela S. Canepa


*There are many abandoned mines in America. I have found old mines, as sometimes they are hidden. They often quietly try to heal themselves in the background of old towns. John Prine sang of mining in his song, ParadiseAfter reading my story, my husband, Bill, suggested I include this song. There is also a 1974 article that tells the back story of John Prine's heartfelt song. Mining is an important part of a history, and of its people, too. 

Shared with:
Photo Prompt,
Flash Fiction of 100-150 Words 

29 comments:

  1. That was most wonderful and we saw many mines in our minds eye!

    ReplyDelete
  2. That is a wonderful take. Mining just leaves unusable land. The earth does recover but it takes very long.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right, it takes a very long time, and is never quite the same. I appreciate your comments, yarnspinnerr. Thank you.

      Delete
  3. Wonderful story. Not only many men didn't come out (alive or at all), many non-humans too, like coal mining ponies. Canada has had many mines too, lost a great many lives. The last mining disaster that comes to my mind, which at least ended with all being rescued, was the one in Chile about 8 or 9 years ago, I think. I remember being at work the day they were rescued, sitting there and watching a live stream newscast of most of it. I don't think I got a lot of work done that day. I would imagine that some of them, at least, have had to struggle with PTSD in the ensuing years. Not something you ever get over, IMO, even if you survive it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly. I recall the 2010 Chile mine disaster. Also, the Pennsylvania mining accident of 2002. There have been many. Even when there is none that we know of, there are unseen ones in the silent tolls taken on lives, health, the land. Scars are often unseen, yet there just the same. Thanks, Kim. Hugs.

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. Thank you, Marg. I appreciate that you liked this post.

      Delete
  5. A nicely written story, Annie, based on many a true tale. Old mining areas hold many secrets of past tragedies. I like your descriptions of the earth around them trying to heal itself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. I believe this is a common thread that resonates with many.

      Delete
  6. A very touching story Annie. It reminded me of the Cape Breton, Nova Scotia coal miners singing group. I'm not sure if you ever hear them sing but I'm sure you and Bill would appreciate hearing them sing.

    The Working Man Men of The Deeps , Youtube video
    They are an awesome group of singing men worth listening to.

    let me know if you've heard of them...

    Smiles & hugs,
    Julia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Julia, Bill and I will be checking this out together. I am sure we will love it. Thank you. I love the idea of them singing! ❤ Hugs!

      Delete
  7. I have always felt bad for mine workers. I never thought about the actual mines, very interesting point of view. XO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To these miners and the people of mining, the land is part of them, they are part of the land. They rely on each other for survival.

      Delete
  8. Thanks for including that song, Annie. What awful things this strip mining has done to our beautiful country. Your story is very powerful. I do pray the earth will eventually heal itself, and I pray that our President does not continue to promote mining as a way to bring jobs to our unemployed. We MUST start relying on sustainable energy. Hugs and prayers, Janet

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There is no easy answer or solution. We are a long way from sustainable energy. We need to find a better, cleaner, safer way than strip mining. And, wind turbines are not the answer for wildlife. We need to keep working toward viable solutions.

      Delete
  9. A very different take on the prompt. Humans dig deep into the bowels of Mother Earth and disturb the ecology. Nature unleashes her fury and swallows humans converting the mines into graveyards. Your post has addressed a grave problem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your comment here. I appreciate your thoughts.

      Delete
  10. It's a difficult life, and it hurts men, beasts, and the earth itself. Well told!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Powerful story. And you and Bill make a good team in so many ways, it seems, including blogging! Be well.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wonderful story! You are so right about mines in your story. I really enjoyed this! Not too far from where I live is Silverton, Colorado where there are silver mines that are healing themselves. When I was a young girl we would go there and find old bottles especially a lot of small opium bottles. I had heard that Chinese would work in the mines there and brought the opium with them. Great story Ann!

    ReplyDelete
  13. A very wonderful story , Annie and a very unique take on the prompt .
    Best wishes,
    Moon
    https://aslifehappens60.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
  14. It really is true that mines have taken the soul of so many people. You made me "feel" a thing that I understand only intellectually. That's some great writing.

    ReplyDelete
  15. "the shafts becoming their tombs" this and the last line are both so powerful!

    ReplyDelete